A falling piece of glacier splashes in the waters of Glacier Bay
Beautiful glaciers at glacier bay Alaska

Alaska Glaciers

Carved by the hands of Mother Nature, meet Alaska masterpieces

Alaska’s glaciers have shaped the surrounding landscapes for millions of years. Mountains, valleys and fjords all come from the slow march these monuments make every day. Today, the glaciers of the Great Land — once only accessible to the adventurous few — are ready for you to explore. With over 50 years of experience cruising to Alaska, we look forward to showing you these unique wonders. All Princess Alaska cruises include at least one glacier-viewing experience.

A Princess ship on an Alaska cruise at Glacier Bay National Park

Glacier Bay National Park

Known as Alaska’s crown jewel, Glacier Bay National Park is otherworldly in its beauty and breadth. This UNESCO World Heritage Site covers millions of acres and contains seven tidewater glaciers as well as mountains and deep fjords. Its waters are even home to whales, seals and otters. Cruise to Glacier Bay National Park and let the landscapes and wildlife show you what makes it so worthy of the utmost protection.

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Dawes Glaciers at Endicott arm

Endicott Arm

Cut from age-old glacial movements, Endicott Arm is a narrow fjord over thirty miles long. Sailing down it gives you a view into some of the most dramatic vistas in the north. See the Alaska glaciers of Endicott Arm, including Dawes Glacier, and revel in the walls of ice that stretch stories above the waterline. Or delight in the cliffsides that are decorated with forests and wildlife.

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Stunning view of glaciers at College Fjord on an Alaska cruise

College Fjord

College Fjord is the meeting place where many of Alaska’s glaciers congregate and flow to the ocean. At the water’s edge are massive valley glaciers and dozens of smaller monuments that dot the mountainous region. Thanks to the professors who first settled here in 1899, many of these glaciers are named after the country’s best institutions of higher learning, such as Harvard Glacier.

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Hubbard glacier seen on a clear day while on an Alaska cruise

Hubbard Glacier

Hubbard Glacier is an unforgettable sight. Alaska’s largest tidewater glacier rises hundreds of feet from the ocean floor and towers above the waves, radiating a brilliant blue in the daylight. Thanks to its exceptional movement speed — for a massive river of ice — the face of this Alaska glacier calves at an incredible rate, providing a breathtaking show for the lucky onlookers.

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Beautiful view of Mendenhall glacier from a field of wildflowers

Mendenhall Glacier

Tucked in the coastal mountains around Juneau, this nearly 14-mile-long glacier cuts through the landscape and ends in a freshwater lake. Mendenhall is the best of Alaska’s ecosystems. It’s home to wildlife, and its rivers are brimming with salmon and trout. Not to mention, its forests burst from every inch of terrain, creating a true wonderland of nature.

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A small ship at the Blackstone glacier

Blackstone Glacier

Nestled within Prince William Sound lies Blackstone Glacier. Named after a miner who disappeared there during a snowstorm, this glacial landmark continues to leave visitors at the edge of their seats. At only 7 miles long, this Alaska glacier is one of the smallest in the region, but nonetheless just as stunning. Venture to Blackstone Glacier on a catamaran adventure during your Copper River cruisetour.

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Matanuska glaciers seen on an Alaska cruisetour

Matanuska Glacier

With ice colored in vibrant blues and bright whites, Matanuska is a sight to be seen on an Alaska Copper River cruisetour. Considered an "ice flow", it floats through valleys under its own weight. This structure measures 24 miles in length and is responsible for creating a "weather hole" — a pocket of sunny skies and enjoyable climates that occurs due to warm valley air being pushed into the atmosphere.

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